In Memory Of 15 Year Old Aboriginal Teen Tina Fontaine

In Memory Of 15 Year Old Aboriginal Teen Tina Fontaine

Also see.

https://aroundhalifaxnovascotia.wordpress.com/2014/09/29/in-memory-of-murdered-native-woman-tanya-brooks/

https://aroundhalifaxnovascotia.wordpress.com/2014/09/29/in-memory-of-murdered-aboriginal-girl-loretta-saunders/

Two bodies found in Winnipeg’s Red River

Published on Aug 18, 2014

Winnipeg police are investigating the discovery of two bodies pulled from the Red River yesterday. Today, police confirmed one is a 15-year-old girl who was murdered.

Walk & Vigil For Tina Fontaine & Faron Hall – Niigaan Sinclair Talks To WAM

ublished on Aug 23, 2014

On Sunday, August 17 the bodies of 15 year old Tina Fontaine and Winnipeg hero who had twice saved people from drowning in the Red River, Faron Hall, were found in that same river, the “mighty Red.”
On Tuesday, August 19 a walk and candlelight vigil was held for for Tina and Faron.

Well over a thousand people took part in this event.
In this video Winnipeg Alternative Media speaks with Niigaan Sinclair, a professor of Aboriginal Studies at the University of Manitoba who helped organize the event. The issues of there being more than 1200 missing or dead aboriginal women, CFS care and the lack of investigation is discussed along with how mainstream media seems to handle it.

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Tina Fontaine ‘didn’t get to live a full life’

Family mourns slain teen who loved kids

SAGKEENG FIRST NATION — When 15-year-old Tina Fontaine’s body was pulled from the Red River last Sunday, an outpouring of anger, sadness and grief enveloped the country. Why was a teen girl being pulled out of the murky waters wrapped in plastic? Answers are still scarce and as murky as the river itself.

On Saturday, friends, family and community members met on the Sagkeeng reserve for an emotional tribute to Tina. The sky opened up and sent rain down on the First Nations community, some 90 kilometres northeast of Winnipeg, as the funeral service began at 2 p.m.

The Roman Catholic Church was standing room only as about 300 people crammed inside to honour their loved one. Tina’s coffin, decorated with ribbons and flowers in her favourite colour, purple, was carried outside nearly two hours later to a hearse that would take her body back to Winnipeg to be cremated.

Thelma Favel, Tina’s great-aunt, broke down in hysterics as the coffin was driven away. She looked ready to collapse in the parking lot before someone grabbed her a chair from inside the church. Her daughter, Samantha Barto, wiped her tears away with a wet cloth.

‘I had to apologize to him because he did give me the responsibility of looking after his girls and keeping them safe and I felt at the church like I failed him’

Favel said she had been asked by Tina’s dad, Eugene Fontaine, to take care of his two daughters, Sarah and Tina. Eugene was killed three years ago and Favel said she felt like she had let him down.

“I had to apologize to him because he did give me the responsibility of looking after his girls and keeping them safe and I felt at the church like I failed him,” she said.

After the funeral, Favel visited the cemetery behind the church. There, Eugene’s body is buried and Tina’s ashes will soon be buried in an urn on top of her dad.

Favel sat on top of Eugene’s grave and wept as a swarm of loved ones surrounded her. Her husband, Joseph Favel, stood opposite her clutching Eugene’s grave marker and crying, too.

“When I came here and looked at (Eugene), it was just like he was smiling. Something was lifted and it’s like he said, ‘She’s with me now.’ It was like I was able to breathe after that,” Favel said. “He released it from me, that guilt, so I wouldn’t carry on thinking that I could have done more — that I failed him by not protecting his daughter.”

Family members said Tina didn’t openly grieve her father’s death and noticed she wasn’t her normal, happy self during the last months of her life. She was reported missing August 9 after she ran away from foster care. Her family believes she went to see her biological mother in Winnipeg. She had visited her earlier in July, but didn’t know her growing up.

“She was taking it hard and was confused. She was trying to join all these programs and it didn’t help her. Everybody kept turning her down and everything,” said her cousin, Joseph Guimond.

Guimond and his girlfriend, Brittany Sanderson, tried to lift Tina’s spirits. They had a baby, Tyrone Guimond, and asked Tina to be his godmother. The couple last saw Tina on June 26 and had their son a day later, so Tina and Tyrone never met.

“She is still his godmother,” said Sanderson. She knew Tina had a way with kids and was the perfect candidate.

Tina’s older brother, Dillon St. Paul, grieved by cutting off his long, braided ponytail during his sister’s funeral. He laid the braid on top of her coffin, a family tradition.

“When they lose a loved one, especially when they’re really close like they were, brother and sister… that’s their tradition to cut their hair. When you lose a loved one, you have to let your hair grow again,” explained cousin Krystal Fontaine.

Another tradition, a four-day wake with a crackling fire that symbolized Tina’s spirit, also ended Saturday. After Tina’s funeral and a subsequent feast, the leftover food was taken back to the Favel’s home to be burned in the fire. This gesture nourished Tina’s spirit, her aunt, Lee Bacon, explained.

“It’s just so sad that some monster had to take her from us,” said Krystal Fontaine. “It hurts — she didn’t get to live a full life. She was a baby.”

jessica.botelho-urbanski@freepress.mb.ca

Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition August 24, 2014 A3

Huge vigil held in support of Tina Fontaine, Faron Hall

Published on Aug 20, 2014

Over 1000 turned out in support of Tina Fontaine and Faron Hall Tuesday. Their bodies were recovered in the Red River in separate incidents over the weekend.

Report about murdered teen Tina Fontaine to be kept secret

The public may never know what exact role Child and Family Services played in Tina Fontaine’s life or her death.

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2014/08/21/report_about_murdered_teen_tina_fontaine_to_be_kept_secret.html

Tina Fontaine’s body was found on Sunday wrapped in a bag in the Red River after she ran away from her Winnipeg foster home where she had been for less than a month

Tina Fontaine’s body was found on Sunday wrapped in a bag in the Red River after she ran away from her Winnipeg foster home where she had been for less than a month

WINNIPEG—Investigations are underway to determine whether Manitoba’s social services failed a 15-year-old aboriginal girl who ran away from foster care and was found dead in the Red River.

But the public may never know what exact role Child and Family Services played in Tina Fontaine’s life or her death.

The province’s children’s advocate automatically investigates whenever a child dies while in care, but the reviews are not made public. Child welfare authorities have also begun their own internal review but that is also confidential.

Ainsley Krone with the advocate’s office said Wednesday a final report will go to the Manitoba medical examiner, the ombudsman and the minister of family services.

To us, Tina Fontaine just another missing native kid: Mallick

Tina Fontaine’s death underscores need for inquiry into murdered and missing aboriginal women: Editorial

“Under our current legislation, we don’t release it publicly,” said Krone, the advocate’s manager of communications, research and public education. “It’s the ombudsman’s office that has the responsibility for tracking the progress of recommendations that we make.”

Fontaine’s body was found on Sunday wrapped in a bag in the Red River after she ran away from her Winnipeg foster home where she had been for less than a month. Police are treating the case as a homicide.

The teen’s death touched a nerve in Winnipeg where more than 1,000 people gathered for a vigil Tuesday night to remember Fontaine and Faron Hall, the so-called “homeless hero” whose body was pulled from the same river where he saved two people from drowning several years ago.

Family Services Minister Kerri Irvin-Ross said she can’t talk about the specifics of Fontaine’s case but said the teen’s death is heartbreaking.

“This is a young woman that had a bright future waiting for her and it was stolen,” she said. “That is devastating for all of us.”

Fontaine’s case is being reviewed at several levels to see if there are lessons that can be drawn, Irvin-Ross said. The government is also looking at ways to make the children’s advocate’s recommendations public, she added.

But, she said, it’s tricky.

“It’s trying to find that balance between confidentiality and protecting the identity of families and children, but also making sure that we are sharing information with Manitobans.”

Despite countless reviews, inquests and inquiries, Manitoba continues to have a tragic history of children who have died while in the care of social services.

The murder of 5-year-old Phoenix Sinclair by her mother and stepfather in 2005 prompted major changes to the system and a doubling of the social services budget. It also spawned one of the most expensive inquiries in the province’s history that produced 62 recommendations.

The office of the children’s advocate still investigates about 160 child deaths each year.

Opposition critic Ian Wishart said it takes an inquest or an inquiry for the public to hear details about the failings of social services. There are still many unanswered questions in Fontaine’s case, he said.

“She had been moved within the last month to a new foster home. Whether or not there were enough supports there is one of the things we’re wondering about,” Wishart said. “She had apparently run away several times and, of course, the last time was with the most unfortunate of results.”

Police spent Wednesday canvassing the downtown area where Fontaine was last seen Aug. 8. Officers would like anyone who may have seen Fontaine or knows what happened to her to contact police.

The teen’s death has prompted renewed calls for a national inquiry into missing and murdered aboriginal women. At a Liberal party meeting in Edmonton on Wednesday, Leader Justin Trudeau said the entire aboriginal community across Canada has been affected by Fontaine’s death.

“It comes on a compounded loss of so many missing and murdered over the years, which is why the Liberal party has always been unequivocal that we need a full, national inquiry into the missing and murdered aboriginal women,” he said.

NDP Leader Tom Mulcair tweeted that he was “disgusted and saddened by this story out of Winnipeg.”

“Enough talk,” he wrote. “We need action and an inquiry, now.”

National Chief Ghislain Picard of the Assembly of First Nations said an inquiry would be an important first step.

“We cannot allow violence to continue, particularly against some of the most vulnerable,” he said in a statement Wednesday. “First Nations demand immediate and concrete steps to better ensure the safety and security of indigenous women and girls in this country.”

The federal government has repeatedly rejected an inquiry. Justice Minister Peter MacKay did so again Tuesday when he said in a statement that it’s “time to take action, not study the issue.”

Tina Fontaine (Walking In A World Of Hurt)

Published on Aug 22, 2014

This song is for Tina Fontaine. Gone too soon….

I’m a songwriter and I claim no expertise where First Nation’s issues are concerned. But it seems possible the local news coverage of my song about Tina may result in some of her friends or family members listening.

To those folks I want to say, simply, I am sorry for your loss. Tina looks (if a picture can, indeed, tell a story) like a spirited kid and one who had many stories in her eyes. I hope you’ll find comfort and healing and justice…

with love and respect
Johnny Maudlin

*The copyright is protected by SOCAN 2014*

Tina’s Walking (In A World Of Hurt)

Tina’s walking in the rain
Every heartbeat pulsing pain
No one out there she can blame
So she keeps her head down
Tina keep your head down…

This town is a one way trip
Litter flying in the cold strips
Every last hope from her heart
So she keeps her head down
Tina keep your head down…

Even drunken bad company is better
Than lonely hours in this cold hard weather…

Tina’s walking can’t you see her
Tina’s crying can’t you hear her
Tina’s walking in a world of hurt
Tina’s walking in a world of hurt…

Tina’s daddy crashed and burned
In a town where the mean streets turn
Into dead end desperate tangles
Spare change hunts for the get out angle
Spare change hunts for the get out angle…

Tina’s brain is dope sick dizzy
Eyes blinded by her tears of fury
Nowhere where she can find peace
So she walks alone on the dark streets
Tina walks alone on the dark streets…

Tina’s red skin life gone shallow
Blood spilled out like a fountain of sorrow…

Tina’s walking can’t you see her
Tina’s crying can’t you hear her
Tina’s walking in a world of hurt
Tina’s walking in a world of hurt….

Tina Fontaine death renews calls for inquiry into missing women

Published on Aug 19, 2014

The death of 15-year-old Tina Fontaine has renewed calls for an inquiry into Canada’s missing and murdered aboriginal women and girls.

Winnipeg Protest Camp: We demand a national inquiry

Published on Aug 24, 2014

Winnipeg, August 24, 2014: On the day following the August 19th vigil and march honouring the memory of Tina Fontaine and Faron Hall, grassroots activists set up a protest camp in Memorial Park to call for a national inquiry into the causes of violence against missing and murdered women in Canada.

By way of background, Tina Fontaine, a 15-year-old girl, had been murdered and her body dumped in the Red River. Faron Hall, a homeless man who gained national fame for rescuing two people from the Red River, drowned under circumstances that are unknown at this time.Their deaths shocked and saddened the community. As a result, thousands converged on the Alexander Docks, on the bank of the Red River, to honour their memory. The mourners then marched through downtown Winnipeg to The Forks where they held a vigil at the Oodena Celebration Circle.

I interviewed two of the women leading the protest camp.

Video Production Paul S. Graham http://paulsgraham.ca

How many more women will it take, asks family of slain teen Tina Fontaine

Canada – Missing Manitoba Girls – Tina Fontaine

Published on Aug 23, 2014

It is a disgrace that the Canadian Police are unable to stop the kidnapping of the native aboriginal girls in their town. There needs to be a national inquiry into their conduct.

If they cannot do their job and protect these people then they are a part of the problem! They must be made to answer for their failings.

Two bodies found in Winnipeg’s Red River

Published on Aug 18, 2014

Winnipeg police are investigating the discovery of two bodies pulled from the Red River yesterday. Today, police confirmed one is a 15-year-old girl who was murdered.

Body pulled from river is missing 15-year-old girl

Published on Aug 18, 2014

Winnipeg Police have identified the body pulled from the Red River Aug 17 as Tina Fontaine, 15, who has been missing since Aug 8. Fontaine was Aboriginal, 5’3″ and last seen wearing a white skirt, blue jacket & pink & white running shoes.

Tina Fontaine came into contact with police before murder

Published on Sep 25, 2014

Winnipeg police revealed stunning new details today about where teenage Tina Fontaine was before she was murdered and who might have been among the last to see her alive.

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