Halifax (Skateboarders) Helmet Reform

  • “I grew up skateboarding in Halifax, when skating with a helmet was a choice you could make without police harassment. Now I live in Vancouver. I have friends who have gone to Nova Scotia to live or vacation and have left NS because they could not tolerate the helmet fines they were being handed for practicing their favorite out-door sport. Skateboarding in Vancouver is an enormous, thriving scene, and the cops leave us alone, as they should.Skateboarding promotes positive, active communities. Let’s see some more respect for skateboarding in NS; if there must be a helmet law, make it for those 16 years old and under.Also, auto insurance should not be connected to helmet-law infractions. If we allow our laws to go down this path, people will be losing their auto-insurance for just about any law infraction.Please repeal this law on helmets and reconsider the auto-insurance no-deal also. Bring N.S. up-to-date and support your athletes!”
    — Angel Bidinost VANCOUVER, CANADA
  • “This is important to me, not because I prefer to not wear a helmet, but because there is a unique optimal solution to this issue, and it’s clear that it has not been achieved. The solution is not simple, and it requires our input. Perhaps this petition will make this more locally apparent.”
    — Mohammad Kidwai HALIFAX, CANADA
  • “It’s absurd. I’ve been skating my whole life and grew up wearing a helmet, but matured to the point that i didn’t need one anymore. It is unacceptable to force those kind of laws on someone.”
    — dan funk DELTA, CANADA
  • “Effectively, this legislation works to demonize youth and discourage sport and exercise. Making helmets mandatory in skateparks for those under 16 is justifiable to a certain extent, but this policy is less about health and safety than about providing police and legislators with tools to tackle a youth counter-culture they do not understand and fear. The proposed legislation works to discourage skateboarding into adulthood by stacking ridiculous consequences (increased auto insurance) to completely unrelated ‘offenses’ (which, when in a public skatepark, are really not offenses to anyone) This is not about safety and it’s definitely not democracy.”
    — Niels Dueck PORT WILLIAMS, CANADA
  • “I am a skateboarder and once you are experienced enough to control your board there is no need for a helmet, Helmet laws shoulden’t be forced, It takes away from the art and sport of skateboarding.”
    — Mat Hinchey OROMOCTO, CANADA
  • “Skateboarding is one of the most popular cultures in nova scotia among youth, this law deter’s youth from participating in an active lifestyle and culture that is based physic’s and the law’s of freedom.This law has no merit towards the safety of skateboarder’s. You cannot create law’s to keep people safe by punishment of fine, it is a rediculous misconception contrived by governments world wide that law’s will keep citizen’s safe from them selves. Like many more examples of this breach of power this one is also damaging to the cape breton region especially. Youth who depend on skateboarding as a lifestyle for the fact that there are no other recreational development for individuals. A complete lack of funding towards facility’s where youth can be safe from the drug’s and alcohol associated with a declining economy.Skateboarding is the one thing that these youth have and are proud to be part of the community for and to deter that activity with senseless enforcement of law’s that will have no real result’s drive’s me to oppose this piece of legislation.skateboarding is not a crime.”
    — Matthew Ingraham SYDNEY, CANADA
  • My introduction to Nova Scotia

    Two weeks after moving here to start my post-university life, I was skateboarding to print resumes at Staples. I had no clue about the helmet law, and was stopped near Metro Centre. There was a mandate to enforce the law with no exceptions during that month, so even showing my Saskatchewan driver’s license wasn’t a help. I got a $140 ticket. I haven’t skateboarded since.

    Two weeks ago, my friends were kicked off of Wentworth for snowboarding without helmets. That’s the lat time we’ll be snowboarding in Nova Scotia, too.

  • Should people who live in very cold climates should have laws that require them to wear gloves in case of frostbite? Or should you be able to judge that for yourself? What about a law for wearing sunscreen when the sun is out? Skin cancer is easily preventable.

    Health care is for everyone. The stupid, and the responsible. I would like to live in a society where everyone is educated enough to make educated decisions.

    From what I can see, the smallest difference these guys are trying to make is that getting caught without a helmet on a board, bike or scooter doesn’t affect your car insurance. The biggest difference would be to make this a personal decision that comes with great responsibility, after the age of 16.

    Everyone knows a helmet will prevent minor head injuries, and if you chose not to wear one…. you know what? It was your choice.

  • Skateboarding is a form of exercise, expression, transportation, and self confidence. Skateboarders are interesting, creative, active people. This law prolongs negative stereotypes of skateboarders everywhere painting them as criminals. This is an age where we need to enhance a positive working relationship between police and skaters. Surely everyone can agree that we do not need laws to enforce personal responsibilities. That is a very slippery slope indeed.

  • “I am currently 18 years young and have been skating for 13 of these years and i come from a small town called westville, nova scotia which thrives on taking skateboards and fining the few people who actually skate in such an underpopulated area so this made me think of how bad it must be in such a big growing city. It’s a shame to say that i wont be able to get even my beginners license until i have my fines from skateboarding paid because it is categorized under the motor vehicle act, i’ll understand this once all the big important local hockey leagues have laws under the motor vehicle act which isnt even a possibility so why skateboards , rollerskates and bicycles? help us out here please”
    — Jayme Dykens WESTVILLE, CANADA
  • “There shouldn’t be any criminalization of sports. This law is based on incorrect stereotypes and helps continue them. It is ultimately very harmful to the wellbeing of our youth population by deterring them from exercising, damaging their longterm physical and mental health.”
    — Iain Childerhose OTTAWA, CANADA
  • “I was Chairperson for a committee with a mandate to build a skateboard park in my community. The project was completed several years ago and the park is used YEAR ROUND by youth and adults. I feel current policy creates barriers to physical activity rather than encouraging it. I understand the role of helmet use but feel the policy could be changed to better serve society, skateboarders and police.”
    — Meghan Detheridge SYDNEY NOVA SCOTIA, CANADA
  • “On the occasions that I skateboard I would rather not be stereotyped as a criminal but treated as the law abiding citizen that I am.”
    — Ryan Gouthro DARTMOUTH, CANADA
  • “because i have had insurance issues after receiving 2 tickets, meaning i have a higher premium and i also had to shop for a DIFFERENT policy when i went to renew”
    — angus knox HALIFAX, CANADA
  • “I’m signing this because I got a ticket (one of 5) on a Sunday afternoon while on my way home from the grocery store with groceries in hand going down a side-street. The cop chased after me, assaulted me by grabbing me and forcefully pulled me off my board (obviously not going very fast if he could run and grab me), most exercise he got the whole year.”
    — Ryan Jewells HALIFAX, CANADA
  • “because i’m a grown man and a skateboarder and accept the risks with it.”
    — Chrys Vilvang MONTREAL, CANADA
  • “This is important because it will allow the growth and development of the skateboarding community”
    — Zacchary Paul HALIFAX, CANADA
  • “It’s actively trying to ban a healthy, cheaper more environmentally friendly alternative to vehicles (not to mention with far fewer fatality rates), once which should be nutured and grown rather than outlawed for reasons you could apply to numerous other forms of transport.”
    — Alexander Bain AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND
  • “I live in Ottawa, but spent between 6 and 8 months a year in HRM renting a house and working. I use a bike to get around because of the fact that even though I have a number of boards and a helmet, I feel like the police pay closer attention to anything a skateboarder does in order to try and get them off the streets. I have never had this problem anywhere else I’ve lived.”
    — Peter Soosalu OTTAWA, CANADA
  • “As an aspiring skateboard photographer I knew that moving to Halifax would be a mistake since it is still in the dark ages when it comes to skateboarding, this is sad because moving to Halifax would be cheaper and closer to my family but I wouldn’t be able to meet as much talent as I need. This ends up in turn driving photography and film talent away from the nova scotia and towards the mainland.”
    — Corey Martinez ST.JOHNS, CANADA
  • “i lived in Ns for about 4 years and have been to court 5 times just for skateboarding without a helmet and its the only reason ive ever had to go to court”
    — Andrew Garland MONTREAL, CANADA
  • “I was lucky enough to visit Halifax in 2000, they had a great scene and don’t deserve to have to deal with this BS.”
    — Jarrah Rushton AUSTRALIA
  • “made the skatepark less fun and my vacation suck having to worry about this stupid law”
    — Paul Jacobs WINDSOR, CANADA
  • “This is important to me because the helmet law enforced as it is now does absolutely nothing to encourage a safe active lifestyle, many skateboarders are old enough and educated enough to make a decision on weather or not to wear a helmet if they feel it is not necessary because of their riding ability. The current legislation that allows it to fall under the motor-vehicle act is just absurd, many safe competent drivers must suffer high insurance costs for an offense unrelated to their driving ability or record.”
    — Stephen Pierrynowski DARTMOUTH, CANADA
  • “My reasons for supporting this petition are: I am a parent of skateboarders and an advocate of the sport/art; I have seen police be unnecessarily rude and abusive when issuing tickets (power tripping); it has created tension between young people and the police force when it could be a positive opportunity for police-youth interaction (and was when the Commons Park first opened); it has stopped large- scale skateboarding tourism events from coming to the province; skateboarding is most similar to figure skating, where no one is forced to where a helmet; skateboarding is statistically less dangerous than many other sports in which the use of helmets is not legally enforced.”
    — Jacquie Thillaye DARTMOUTH, CANADA
  • “It’s important to me because I’m a skateboarder and if this happened where I live I would be outraged.”
    — Patrick O’Brien GENEVA, IL
  • “This law is making people not want to skateboard.”
    — Keagan Nickerson HALIFAX, CANADA
  • “Because skateboarding doesn’t require a helmet. I would be outraged if this law passed where I lived. It’s a person’s choice to wear a helmet or not to wear a helmet, not the government’s.”
    — Chris Buckley TEMPE, AZ
  • “I’m tired of hearing about my boys getting there decks took away and them getting arrested for doing something they love cause they ain’t got the money for a helmet, Helmet for what even, It’s insulting a helmet is for a child in practice for safety. Skateboarding is a profession, and should be looked at it more that way”
    — Sara Chow NOVA SCOTIA, CANADA
  • “I don’t want my son to be continually harassed by police for getting exercise.”
    — Anthony Purcell LUNENBURG, CANADA
  • “Having skated ‘the commons’ in Halifax and other parks in the New Glasgow & Stellarton area, it is essential that Nova Scotia’s public facilities remain a place where participants are free to choose their need for personal protective equipment (PPE). PPE is not required by law for other public sporting activities (baseball, soccer, lawn bowling, etc.), putting civil liberties at risk of a slippery slope of institutionalization. Furthermore, helmets interfere with advanced levels of skateboarding and can increase the chance of injury as a physical obstruction. Persons not accustomed to using PPE (ie provincial visitors like myself) are at a greater risk of injury and will shy away from participation due to current legislation. A possible solution to this problem may be to augment the law to include only children under a certain age (12 and under) to ensure at risk groups are covered. Public facilities might also include “use at own risk” signage to waive liability.”
    — Brian Curran TORONTO, CANADA
  • Help change this legisk8ion

  • People being ticketed for skateboarding. The two kids had their boards taken away for a month at the beginning of the summer. The ticket for skateboarding on the sidewalk is one of many that people were falsely issued and paid due to misinformed HRP Officers.

  • “There shouldn’t be any criminalization of sports. This law is based on incorrect stereotypes and helps continue them. It is ultimately very harmful to the wellbeing of our youth population by deterring them from exercising, damaging their longterm physical and mental health.”
    — Iain Childerhose OTTAWA, CANADA
  • “I was Chairperson for a committee with a mandate to build a skateboard park in my community. The project was completed several years ago and the park is used YEAR ROUND by youth and adults. I feel current policy creates barriers to physical activity rather than encouraging it. I understand the role of helmet use but feel the policy could be changed to better serve society, skateboarders and police.”
    — Meghan Detheridge SYDNEY NOVA SCOTIA, CANADA
  • “On the occasions that I skateboard I would rather not be stereotyped as a criminal but treated as the law abiding citizen that I am.”
    — Ryan Gouthro DARTMOUTH, CANADA
  • “because i have had insurance issues after receiving 2 tickets, meaning i have a higher premium and i also had to shop for a DIFFERENT policy when i went to renew”
    — angus knox HALIFAX, CANADA
  • “I’m signing this because I got a ticket (one of 5) on a Sunday afternoon while on my way home from the grocery store with groceries in hand going down a side-street. The cop chased after me, assaulted me by grabbing me and forcefully pulled me off my board (obviously not going very fast if he could run and grab me), most exercise he got the whole year.”
    — Ryan Jewells HALIFAX, CANADA
  • “because i’m a grown man and a skateboarder and accept the risks with it.”
    — Chrys Vilvang MONTREAL, CANADA
  • “This is important because it will allow the growth and development of the skateboarding community”
    — Zacchary Paul HALIFAX, CANADA
  • “It’s actively trying to ban a healthy, cheaper more environmentally friendly alternative to vehicles (not to mention with far fewer fatality rates), once which should be nutured and grown rather than outlawed for reasons you could apply to numerous other forms of transport.”
    — Alexander Bain AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND
  • “I live in Ottawa, but spent between 6 and 8 months a year in HRM renting a house and working. I use a bike to get around because of the fact that even though I have a number of boards and a helmet, I feel like the police pay closer attention to anything a skateboarder does in order to try and get them off the streets. I have never had this problem anywhere else I’ve lived.”
    — Peter Soosalu OTTAWA, CANADA
  • “As an aspiring skateboard photographer I knew that moving to Halifax would be a mistake since it is still in the dark ages when it comes to skateboarding, this is sad because moving to Halifax would be cheaper and closer to my family but I wouldn’t be able to meet as much talent as I need. This ends up in turn driving photography and film talent away from the nova scotia and towards the mainland.”
    — Corey Martinez ST.JOHNS, CANADA
  • “i lived in Ns for about 4 years and have been to court 5 times just for skateboarding without a helmet and its the only reason ive ever had to go to court”
    — Andrew Garland MONTREAL, CANADA
  • “I was lucky enough to visit Halifax in 2000, they had a great scene and don’t deserve to have to deal with this BS.”
    — Jarrah Rushton AUSTRALIA
  • “made the skatepark less fun and my vacation suck having to worry about this stupid law”
    — Paul Jacobs WINDSOR, CANADA
  • “This is important to me because the helmet law enforced as it is now does absolutely nothing to encourage a safe active lifestyle, many skateboarders are old enough and educated enough to make a decision on weather or not to wear a helmet if they feel it is not necessary because of their riding ability. The current legislation that allows it to fall under the motor-vehicle act is just absurd, many safe competent drivers must suffer high insurance costs for an offense unrelated to their driving ability or record.”
    — Stephen Pierrynowski DARTMOUTH, CANADA
  • “My reasons for supporting this petition are: I am a parent of skateboarders and an advocate of the sport/art; I have seen police be unnecessarily rude and abusive when issuing tickets (power tripping); it has created tension between young people and the police force when it could be a positive opportunity for police-youth interaction (and was when the Commons Park first opened); it has stopped large- scale skateboarding tourism events from coming to the province; skateboarding is most similar to figure skating, where no one is forced to where a helmet; skateboarding is statistically less dangerous than many other sports in which the use of helmets is not legally enforced.”
    — Jacquie Thillaye DARTMOUTH, CANADA
  • “It’s important to me because I’m a skateboarder and if this happened where I live I would be outraged.”
    — Patrick O’Brien GENEVA, IL
  • “This law is making people not want to skateboard.”
    — Keagan Nickerson HALIFAX, CANADA
  • “Because skateboarding doesn’t require a helmet. I would be outraged if this law passed where I lived. It’s a person’s choice to wear a helmet or not to wear a helmet, not the government’s.”
    — Chris Buckley TEMPE, AZ
  • “I’m tired of hearing about my boys getting there decks took away and them getting arrested for doing something they love cause they ain’t got the money for a helmet, Helmet for what even, It’s insulting a helmet is for a child in practice for safety. Skateboarding is a profession, and should be looked at it more that way”
    — Sara Chow NOVA SCOTIA, CANADA
  • “I don’t want my son to be continually harassed by police for getting exercise.”
    — Anthony Purcell LUNENBURG, CANADA
  • “Having skated ‘the commons’ in Halifax and other parks in the New Glasgow & Stellarton area, it is essential that Nova Scotia’s public facilities remain a place where participants are free to choose their need for personal protective equipment (PPE). PPE is not required by law for other public sporting activities (baseball, soccer, lawn bowling, etc.), putting civil liberties at risk of a slippery slope of institutionalization. Furthermore, helmets interfere with advanced levels of skateboarding and can increase the chance of injury as a physical obstruction. Persons not accustomed to using PPE (ie provincial visitors like myself) are at a greater risk of injury and will shy away from participation due to current legislation. A possible solution to this problem may be to augment the law to include only children under a certain age (12 and under) to ensure at risk groups are covered. Public facilities might also include “use at own risk” signage to waive liability.”
    — Brian Curran TORONTO, CANADA
  • Help change this legisk8ion

    Hello my name is Neil Blackwood, I’m writing here to give my full support towards the efforts to have this ridiculous law and these legislation changed to prevent anyone from being affected such as Pat Harland and myself. I lived in Halifax for 4 years in that time I’ve received numerous tickets and fines for riding with no helmet, riding on the sidewalk/streets. Currently I live in Newfoundland my home province (were no such laws exist i might add) . Recently I’ve received mail from Revenue Canada On behalf of the Nova Scotia Government saying that as of now due to my outstanding fines I will Be having my Income Tax benefits and GST garnished in full until the sum of my violations under the HRM Motor Vehicle Act (I.E. helmet tickets) are paid in full through this means of repayment. I am not the only one I know who has been affected in this way by my violations in NS. I never had a NS drivers licence so I never bothered to deal with the tickets but now that its gone to collection through Revenue Canada I think it`s a little more serious then I previously thought. The Nova Scotia Government has pushed things to far and now its time they hear our voices loud and clear cause the time has come they are taking a fun and humbling sport like skateboarding and turned it into a punishable crime with very serious consequences that are now coming to light. I hope that the voices of the adults and youth of Nova Scotia are finally heard because this had gone on to long with no resistence. JOIN THE FIGHT to take skateboarding back from those who don’t deserve to have a say in it at ALL. Thank you

  • People being ticketed for skateboarding. The two kids had their boards taken away for a month at the beginning of the summer. The ticket for skateboarding on the sidewalk is one of many that people were falsely issued and paid due to misinformed HRP Officers.

  • Halifax Helmet Reform – Images, Stories, and Documents

    Here you will find images, stories, and pdf copies of research studies supporting our cause.

© 2013 HALIFAX HELMET REFORM
—————————-
Darrell Dexter - Premier of Nova Scotia: Repeal or amend policy regarding use of helmets skateboarding

SIGN PETITION

http://www.change.org/en-CA/petitions/darrell-dexter-premier-of-nova-scotia-repeal-or-amend-policy-regarding-use-of-helmets-skateboarding#
Petitioning John MacDonellDarrell Dexter – Premier of Nova Scotia: Repeal or amend policy regarding use of helmets skateboardingThe current legislation in place regarding skateboarding in Nova Scotia has done nothing to promote safety or promote skateboarding as a positive pastime or a viable form of active transportation. We are now seeing people lose their insurance coverage due to this outrageous law:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2013/01/31/ns-helmet-auto-insurance.html
The primary effect of this legislation has been to drive young people away from Nova Scotia and caused many people to quit skateboarding.

In turn this has hurt our local economy by vilifying skateboarding and in turn not supporting local specialized retailers.

Nova Scotia has done a lot to build and maintain a large number of skateparks within the province, but it hasn’t addressed the current policy regarding mandatory use of helmets regardless of age.

Having an abundance of facilities is great in principle but these facilities will not attract contests or professional skateboard demos with the current policy, and the lack of these will not allow for growth within the scene or attract newcomers to try this beneficial form of recreation.

Regardless of the facilities, the lack of skateboard related tourism will not make Nova Scotia a hub for skateboarding while this policy still exists.A large number of gifted skateboarders have had to leave the province to flourish within the skateboard industry due to the policy in place within this province.

Many of these skateboarders that have left to fulfill skateboarding as a career have received sponsorships from large international companies, and have had to depart to fulfill the requests and conditions of their sponsorship based upon the mandatory use of a helmet within the province.

Below we have attached a quote from one of the sponsored amateur skateboarders who has had to leave to further themselves within the skateboarding industry.“As a skateboarder in Halifax I felt unwelcomed and stereotyped by the police and the Province.

On one occasion I was being given a ticket I couldn’t afford to pay for riding my skateboard at the Commons, while in the background I watched a football practice where young players were repeatedly tackling each other to the ground with much crunching and grunting, and none of the players wore helmets.

I pointed this out to the officer who was writing me a ticket and he laughed at me.

The policy in place in Nova Scotia seems to be less about health and safety, and more about demonizing skateboarding. While I lived there I felt constantly in fear of any police I encountered, even while not skateboarding.” –Ben Stephenson, who attended NSCAD and now resides in Montreal.

What we ask is that if the current legislation regarding helmets is not repealed, that it be amended to be mandatory for those under 16 years of age and optional for adults.

We feel this is fair, as it protects children who may be inexperienced and unable to make proper decisions on their own safety at that point.

It also would give adults the freedom to choose to enjoy their sport the way everyone in the rest of the world can much like legislation regarding driving, hunting, voting, and consuming alcohol.A universal helmet law with no age limit for skateboarding has never been effective anywhere in the world*.

In fact we have been unable to find any other place to compare this law to. We do know that the statistics are clear when it comes to the prevalence of head injuries by sport. Soccer, Baseball, Swimming, Horseback Riding, Sledding and Ice Skating all have much higher instances of head injuries per hospital visit**.Unfortunately, there haven’t been any real studies on the net health effect of
skateboarding helmet laws as this broad law doesn’t exist anywhere else to the extent that it does in Nova Scotia. However if we use bicycle helmet laws as an analogue for skateboarding (disregarding the 5.9% TBI per hospital visit for skatebording VS 8.1% for cycling in the 2001-2009 CDC study) there is mountains of evidence indicating the net health effect of helmet laws is negative because of the stiff decrease in participation.

*** Anecdotaly speaking, anyone who has been skateboarding in Nova Scotia for more than 10 years remembers what it was like before the helmet laws were enforced versus now.People are using their unfounded assumptions about what skateboarding is and who participates it before using actual science and facts to draw a logical conclusion.

We are not against people being safe. We just believe that a person has the right to weigh the risks of what they are doing and act accordingly. Please view our supporting documentation below and support our cause. Thank you for your time.*US Helmet Laws from Helmets.org

http://www.helmets.org/mandator.htm

**Nonfatal Traumatic Brain Injuries Related to Sports and Recreation Activities Among

Persons Aged ?19 Years — United States, 2001–2009

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6039a1.htm?s_cid=mm6039a1_w – Table 1

***Reduction of 35-37% for cycling rate in Victoria and New South Whales – Australia after mandatory helmet laws.

http://www.roble.net/marquis/cached/agbu.une.edu.au/~drobinso/velo1/velo.html

Laws Passed in Alberta lead to a 51.6% net decrease in child and adolescent cycling

http://www.cycle-helmets.com/canada_helmets.html (uses Official province of Alberta Stats)

Cities that have repealed or reduced helmet laws
http://www.cyclehelmets.org/1214.html

Other information:

http://BicycleSafe.com explains that there is nothing wrong with wearing a helmet but the real issue is rider skill, this is mainly about bicycles but the same logic applies to
skateboards, even moreso as we have a lower amount of head injuries to begin with.
http://bicyclesafe.com/helmets.html

We have started a tumblr page as a place to share different sorts of media regarding this. http://halifaxhelmetreform.tumblr.com/
To:
John MacDonell, Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations
Darrell Dexter, Premier of Nova Scotia
We feel that the skateboarding helmet law reflects outdated negative stereotypes of skateboarding as an “extreme” sport and somehow more dangerous than other recreational activities. These beliefs can be easily proven false with several major studies.Here are our requests:Item 170B(1) of The Moter Vehicle Act be removed as it should have no
bearing on a persons auto insurance or ability to be licensed.Helmets be made either optional for all participants of the sports under
170B(1) or optional for those above a set age. 12 or 16 might be appropriate.If a law must be applied to children in this case, then we ask that
there be an official procedure for police to follow to help improve
relations with the youth and the police.Our reasoning is sound, the damage caused by criminalizing a recreational activity is much higher than the risk caused by not having a helmet law.As an alternative way of encouraging safety equipment we propose that
we take the current program where police officers give helmets to kids,
but instead of telling them they’ll get in trouble if they don’t wear it
they come back and have some sort of reward for those that are wearing it.
We need to repair the community relationship between youth and police.We have the infrastructure already in place to make a huge change in
people’s lives and help bring people into the province! There have been
$4 million in skateparks created in Nova Scotia since skateboarding was added to the MVA. We need to be encouraging people to use them, the people of Nova Scotia need as few barriers as possible between them and a healthy lifestyle.

Sincerely,
[Your name]
Supporters
Reasons for signing

Brandon Johnston BERWICK, CANADA

I grew up skateboarding, it’s a great activity, and in a lot of ways I believe it’s a natural response to our increasingly urbanized world.

This law, however, is taking all the fun out of the sport. Statistically, head injuries from skateboarding are very low, and a helmet is unnecessary for an experienced rider.

I agree that perhaps there should be some regulation for younger riders, who are more prone to injuring themselves while starting out, but after the age of 16 or 18 the law is ridiculous. This is not the same as riding a motorcycle, and it will never be obeyed by skateboard enthusiasts, no matter how much it is enforced.

Skateboarding exists as a response to modern culture – increasingly commercialized sports, concrete everywhere – and if you want to keep kids active, outdoors and pushing creative boundaries, repeal this law.
Ben Stephenson HALIFAX, CANADA

This terrible law has gone on way, way too long.
Devin McLean HALIFAX, CANADA

This city might think it’s being progressive but in reality this is just one of the many ignorant laws that makes Halifax outdated
Devon Bennett DARTMOUTH, CANADA

Because the law is useless.
Andrew Lynch HALIFAX, CANADA

Because I skate silly goose!
Rebecca Laughlin MONTREAL, CANADA

I, Rebecca Laughlin, am signing this because when I lived in Halifax, at the end of every month the police always fined me for not wearing my helmet. I was known as the skater girl who always got tickets. It is my responsibility to protect me head, I think the polices concern for our safety is not a genuine concern anyway.

Once I saw two police in a police CAR swerve to cut off a skateboarder to give him s ticket. This happened on Quinpool road, they car-chased a skateboarder. One of the police, after swerving their car in front of the skateboarder, threw himself onto the skatebiarder tackling him to the ground. Just so they could give him a ticket for not wearing a helmet.

They could have killed the guy with their car! Or injured him by tackling him off his board to the ground! I was shocked the police would cause much much more of a risk to the skateboarder just to give him a ticket about protecting himself. The polices behavior on this entire subject is laughable.

The only reason they enforce this law is to fill their quota. The police should use tax payers money to fight crime, not use our money to fine us for more money over helmet laws. Fining people will not cause people to wear their helmet anyway. I had probably 6 tickets, I still don’t wear my helmet and I never will.

Thank you.
Stephen Amero WAVERLEY, CANADA

The ” Law ” wearing a helmet while riding a skateboard is a cash grab and a violation of our right to freedom of choice.
Chris Dratwa HALIFAX, CANADA

I drive a car and bike and can not afford to be paying any higher insurance rates or my company dropping me due to not wearing a helmet on my skateboard that I have been riding in dartmouth and halifax for the past 14 years
jermaine arsenault DARTMOUTH, CANADA

This is important to me because it simply singles out skateboarders. Police give the speech about head injury, yet the actual facts show otherwise.. Also this is the one means of outdoor activity some people choose to take up instead of being in the streets causing problems for the rest of the city and the police are turning people off from wanting to be involved.. This law was simply made by people who know nothing about our sport and who are simply looking for a easy income for the city.
Cameron Evans HALIFAX, CANADA

I got a ticket for skateboarding without a helmet so I had to walk home. On the way, I got jumped around pizza corner and the cops didn’t do anything as I was repeatedly kicked in the ribs.
Jeremy Stewart TOFINO BC, CANADA

Because it is wrongto have a personal item away from you just for not wearing a piece of equipment. I know helmets do protect you from a lot of stuff, but I think it should be your own decision and not a law. If someone is not bright enough to wear a helmet while doing something dangerous, they will pay consequences eventually. Also while its a law, it is mandatory to wear a helmet just for transportation to say a grocery store or something. That just doesnt make sense to me, it’s a hassle that makes life harder.
Tommy Fleming KIRKUP AVE, CANADA

Because this amazing city is being ruined by the ignorant public servants that run it.
Scott Kartagener DIX HILLS, NY

This law is absolutely ridiculous.
Jeremy Webb VANCOUVER, CANADA

i’m a tax paying skateboarder, and this issue like so many others handled by police, is a complete waste of time.
travis cutler VANCOUVER, CANADA

The criminalization of youth through mandatory helmet laws not only deters activity but also fosters the idea within the youth community that they are criminals.
sean connelly MONTREAL, CANADA

Imposed helmet laws for adults, especially in the confines of a designated public skateboard park is ridiculous. I have been ticketed many times and have had my skateboard taken permanently. I have been bothered by HRM police at the commons skate park many times while male prostitutes hook a football fields length away on Trollope st.

On one particular occasion I informed two bike police officers what was going on in the distance, they looked and turned their backs on this perversion, thinking me rolling around on four wheels with no helmet was more important. Whats more important, ticketing a 28 year old man for skateboarding in the evening, or stopping public perversion?
Angel Bidinost VANCOUVER, CANADA

I grew up skateboarding in Halifax, when skating with a helmet was a choice you could make without police harassment. Now I live in Vancouver. I have friends who have gone to Nova Scotia to live or vacation and have left NS because they could not tolerate the helmet fines they were being handed for practicing their favorite out-door sport. Skateboarding in Vancouver is an enormous, thriving scene, and the cops leave us alone, as they should.

Skateboarding promotes positive, active communities. Let’s see some more respect for skateboarding in NS; if there must be a helmet law, make it for those 16 years old and under.

Also, auto insurance should not be connected to helmet-law infractions. If we allow our laws to go down this path, people will be losing their auto-insurance for just about any law infraction.

Please repeal this law on helmets and reconsider the auto-insurance no-deal also. Bring N.S. up-to-date and support your athletes!
Jason Gauthier VALLEY, CANADA

If a law is so dumb that any parent whose child breaks it almost always side with the child, then that law should be repealed.
Ryan Callaghan CHARLOTTETOWN, CANADA

Last time I visited Halifax, it was meant to be a skateboarding trip. I tried to go skate at the skatepark, and instantly almost got the most ridiculous fine because I didn’t have a helmet. I was furious because; 1) I didn’t bring a helmet because I wasn’t aware of this absurd law, 2) my trip to Halifax was basically for nothing, I immediately made my way home, and 3) I felt awful for the kids who get stuck with a fine for basically no reason.

This is actually the most aggravating law, it makes no sense. Sure, skateboarding may be dangerous, but I believe it’s ultimately the person skateboarding’s choice to wear a helmet, and their right to refuse to wear one.
Julien Brown MONTREAL, CANADA

makes no sense… do we force darell to use lube when hes banging his wife??
Gregory Caskie VANCOUVER, CANADA

Statistically skateboarding is safer than basketball. This is an assault of freedom that is not supported by injury data. A clear example of the “mommy-state”. Furthermore, helmet rules end up costing more money in insurance b/c there is then a rule that needs enforcement which costs money.

So this law 1) violates personal freedom, 2) does not protect the well being of skateboarders, and 3) costs more tax payer money.

Sounds like three strikes and the law should be throw out!
Jarrah Rushton AUSTRALIA

I was lucky enough to visit Halifax in 2000, they had a great scene and don’t deserve to have to deal with this BS.
jon kynock HALIFAX, CANADA

i live here
Martin Kohoutek KOSTELEC NA HANé, CZECH REPUBLIC

Because I skate for 10 years now, and I never needed helmet on sidewalk. It is my decision, so why it has to be different for them?
riley smith HALIFAX, CANADA

I feel naked without my skateboard.
Brian Shannon MONTREAL, CANADA

I have been to beautiful Halifax a few times to skate. But then I realized I never wanted to go back because of that stupid helmet law. Halifax isn’t a soft place, why such a soft law?
Jeff Thorburn VANCOUVER, CANADA

I believe skateboarding and all positive endeavors adopted by youth should be fostered, not stifled.
david birnie BURNABY, CANADA

As the marketing director for Timebomb Trading this law has excluded Nova Scotia out of every skateboard tour we have done. Including bringing the Emerica Team there this upcoming summer.
kevin lowry CALGARY, CANADA

I visit friends and family in halifax
Nate Solomon CARMICHEAL, CA

I’m a skater myself.
gabriel drasse BELOEIL, CANADA

fuck le systême vive l’anarchie
sebastien Petit SAINT-BRUNO, CANADA

Liberty of choice!!!!
joe buffalo BURNABY B.C, CANADA

because this is just fuckin ridiculous!!
John van Gurp HALIFAX, NS, CANADA

This law is far too heavy handed. At the least it should be removed from the MVA and definitely needs to be ‘disconnected” from one’s driver’s license.
Robyn Mitchell CHICAGO, IL

The legislation in Nova Scotia often does not look at the broader picture: the health of the province AND the people which live within it. The skateboarding law may have had good intentions at its heart but the way it has been implemented has caused the vilification of skateboarding and its participants.

I was once an adolescent in Nova Scotia myself and I know the importance of finding an activity that engages you and keeps you active in order to feel as though you belong SOMEWHERE in the place in which you were born.
nicolas proulx LéVIS, CANADA

this is just ridiculous
Jordan LeBlanc WOLFVILLE, CANADA

I am not a skate boarder, nor do I live in Halifax. But as a Nova Scotian resident, clearly more younger people leaving this province is taking away exactly what this province is trying to stop. I support the cause that helmets should be optional for individuals 16+. As our population ages, NS is going to be faced with a huge dilemma, we need our younger population, do not push them away.
Kyle Rizsanyi NEW GERMANY, CANADA

I stopped skateboarding for this very reason.
ian shaw DARTMOUTH, CANADA

if it wasn’t for skateboarding i’d be in jail, unlike some of my peers growing up….does motor vehicle act apply to sportsfields and public parks?
Ryan Wilkie CHARLOTTETOWN, PE, CANADA

As a former resident of Halifax I had several personal encounters and tickets under this very policy
nick everson HALIFAX, CANADA

this is important to me because some big wig has decided to add points to your insurance for not wearing a helmet on a childs play thing pathetic like the rest of goverment
Kory Stevens HALIFAX, CANADA

We have more than enough difficulty getting people to stay in the maritimes, let’s not make this any worse.
Lucas Swinimer MRTINS POINT, CANADA

I am a fellow skateboarder
Sam Clayworth LONDON, CANADA

I am a skateboarder.
Jason Champagne TORONTO, CANADA

I’ve been skateboarding for over 25 years and only used a helmet when riding a vert ramp, I won’t go to a skatepark that makes me wear one and that’s how privately owned skate parks go out of business hurting the local skateboard industry from potential growth. It should be up to the skateboarder to judge what their abilities are and what pads they want to wear.

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https://canadiansituations.wordpress.com/2013/01/12/nova-scotias-protection-of-property-act-is-an-act-of-communism/

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Published on Aug 8, 2013

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5 thoughts on “Halifax (Skateboarders) Helmet Reform”

  1. Its like you read my thoughts! You appear to know so much approximately this, such as you
    wrote the e book in it or something. I believe that you just could do with some % to drive the message house a bit, however
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  2. I’m 34 and have been skateboarding for over 25 years. I’ve gotten 7 helmet fines in the last 10 years(all in Halifax)The last one was given to me after I rolled about 10 to 15 feet(only to quickly cross the crosswalk at the appropriate time in the appropriate area, for a right turning car. all legal except the “no helmet”) and by the time the parked cop had started and sped up to me(lights flashing), I had already picked up my board and walked 20 or more steps. I wanted to loose it but have been around long enough to know better. So I just took the ticket and walked away thinking of all the pointless fights(verbal) I gotten into trying to reason with cops who only wait for their turn to talk instead of actually listing. The fact is:I’m much more safe not wearing a helmet. I’ve spent 4 years trying to get used to it but only had injuries as a result. I couldn’t care less about how I look wearing a helmet(which is the only reason cops believe we don’t wear em’) Bottom line. Me wearing a helmet= injury=hospital visit=not being able to do the thing that has saved my life many times. Me not wearing a helmet=$180 fine=no $$$ for food=depression=A life I spent 10 years trying to escape, Sounds a bit dramatic I know, but skating actually IS that important to me. I personally know 6 police men/women. I’m not friends with any of them. Not for reasons people may think. 4 of them will flat out admit that they don’t agree with a large number of laws they enforce, take their duty as a job and nothing more, and couldn’t care less about actually catching known criminals(doing real work) They would much rather give helmet tickets and fines for traffic violations. The other two were known bullies all throughout school and have obvious anger issues. So maybe this helmet thing is just a tiny glimpse into a major world wide social issue.

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